9 Best Charities That Fight for Racial Equality (Complete 2021 List)

9 Best Charities That Fight for Racial Equality (Complete 2021 List)

By
Dennis Kamprad

Read Time:17 Minutes

Follow
this site

follow follow

Impactful Ninja is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. For example, as Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases. Learn more Learn more .

Affiliate Disclosure

Hey fellow impactful ninja đź‘‹

You may have noticed that Impactful Ninja is all about providing helpful information to make a positive impact on the world and society. And that we love to link back to where we found all the information for each of our posts.

  • Most of these links are informational-based for you to check out their primary sources with one click.

  • But some of these links are so-called "affiliate links" to products that we recommend.

Why do we add these product links?

First and foremost, because we believe that they add value to you. For example, when we wrote a post about the environmental impact of long showers, we came across an EPA recommendation to use WaterSense showerheads. So we linked to where you can find them. Or, for many of our posts, we also link to our favorite books on that topic so that you can get a much more holistic overview than one single blog post could provide.

And when there is an affiliate program for these products, we sign up for it. For example, as Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

What do these affiliate links mean for you?
  1. First, and most importantly, we still only recommend products that we believe add value for you.

  2. When you buy something through one of our affiliate links, we may earn a small commission - but at no additional costs to you.

  3. And when you buy something through a link that is not an affiliate link, we won’t receive any commission but we’ll still be happy to have helped you.

What do these affiliate links mean for us?
  1. When we find products that we believe add value to you and the seller has an affiliate program, we sign up for it.

  2. When you buy something through one of our affiliate links, we may earn a small commission (at no extra costs to you).

  3. And at this point in time, all money is reinvested in sharing the most helpful content with you. This includes all operating costs for running this site and the content creation itself.

What does this mean for me personally?

You may have noticed by the way Impactful Ninja is operated that money is not the driving factor behind it. It is a passion project of mine and I love to share helpful information with you to make a positive impact on the world and society. However, it's a project in that I invest a lot of time and also quite some money.

Eventually, my dream is to one day turn this passion project into my full-time job and provide even more helpful information. But that's still a long time to go.

Stay impactful,

People of all races and ethnic backgrounds deserve equitable rights, protection, and opportunities. But with so many charities promoting racial equality, and fighting against discrimination, we had to ask: What are the best charities that fight for racial equality?

The best charities that fight for racial equality are the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Advancement Project, and the Center for Constitutional Rights. These charities campaign for racial equity and promote equal rights for people of color and ethnic minorities.

Whether you want to get involved in a community movement, learn more about combating racism in society, or raise awareness on racial equality, there is a charity for you. Keep reading to learn more about what the best charities that fight for racial equality are all about, how they work, and what your best way would be to make a contribution. 

Here’s What All the Best Charities That Fight for Racial Equality Have in Common

The charities on this list were chosen based on their vision, mission, and contributions to racial equality movements. They also have a great impact and transparency ratings and are dedicated to promoting the rights of all peoples, regardless of their race or ethnic background. 

These charities fight for racial equality through community programming, fundraising, and advocacy campaigns. They also push for equal social, economic, and political opportunities by supporting communities that are marginalized because of their race, ethnicity, and minority status.

These Are the 9 Best Charities That Fight for Racial Equality

Below are our favorite charities that fight for racial equality (you can click on their link to directly jump to their section in this article):

(At the end of this article, we’ll also share our six-step approach on how you can select the best charity to support.)

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Advocates for the Rights of Minorities 

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded in 1908 by Mary White Ovington, Oswald Garrison Villard,  William English Walling, and Dr. Henry Moscowitz – a group of journalists, liberals, and activists. They came together to discuss the violent race riots occurring in Springfield, Illinois, and created a call for racial equality, leading to the formation of today’s NAACP. This call was signed by over 60 people, including W.E.B. Du Bois, a famous civil rights activist. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: The organization maintains an Accountability and Transparency score of 97 out of 100, and a Financial score of 88 out of 100, both from Charity Navigator. It currently holds a Bronze Star of Transparency from GuideStar. In 2019, nearly 71% of the organization’s income was spent on its programming. 

“To remove all barriers of racial discrimination through democratic processes.”

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

What they do: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) mobilizes activists across the US to defend the rights of minorities, with an active presence in all 50 states. NAACP promotes the equity of those discriminated against because of their race, through advocacy campaigns and grassroots movements. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its inception, the organization has mobilized over 15,000 youth activists in the US to fight for racial justice and equality, a small fraction of the organization’s active 2 million members and advocates. In 2020, the organization’s large member pool enabled them to reach over 1 million Black individuals to discuss the importance of Census participation. In the same year, the organization called for the creation of 1 cabinet-level position to oversee racial justice and equality in the US. NAACP was successful in its efforts, and Dr. Susan Rice was appointed to the role.

Ways to contribute: You can donate to the NAACP by donating via the organization’s website. You can also join your local NAACP group to volunteer, fight for racial justice, and participate in community activities.

The Advancement Project: Promoting Racial Equity for People of Color

The Advancement Project was founded in 1999 by a group of civil rights activists and lawyers. After establishing the organization, the group went on to bring public attention to cases that involved unfair treatment of Black students in schools. They also advocated for the rights of students affected by forms of segregation and racial discrimination.

Their impact and transparency ratings: The Advancement Project holds a respectable Accountability and Transparency score of 85 out of 100 from Charity Navigator. The organization also has a Gold Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, based on their previous financial reporting. For example, in 2019, more than 80% of the organization’s income was spent on its racial equality programming. 

“We envision a future where people of color are free – where they can thrive, be safe and exercise power.”

The Advancement Project

What they do: The Advancement Project supports communities on racial equality and provides them with tools and capacity-building resources to create change locally. The organization also strives to promote racial equality and justice on a national level through large-scale campaigns, policy changes, and advocacy work. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its founding, the Advancement Project has expanded across 19 US states to provide racial equality advocacy to communities across the country. In 2020, the organization filed 5 lawsuits demanding the release of vulnerable inmates from minority backgrounds. In the same year, the Advancement Project also filed 3 lawsuits against the state of Florida and Virginia, demanding more voting rights to Black and Latino voters.

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to the Advancement Project by donating through the organization’s website. You can also attend one of the organization’s events to show your support.

Center for Constitutional Rights: Fighting for Racial and Social Justice

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) was founded in 1966 by Arthur Kinoy and William Kunstler, two civil rights activists. The founders were driven by rising social injustices in American society and were eager to build an organization that fought for racial and social equality. They also wanted to protect and defend civil and human rights for all people. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: The Center for Constitutional Rights maintains an impressive 4-star rating and an Accountability and Transparency score of 100 out of 100 from Charity Navigator. In 2020, the organization spent nearly 80% of its income on its programs and advocacy. 

“CCR is committed to addressing the structural and systemic nature of racism in our society.”

Center for Constitutional Rights

What they do: The Center for Constitutional Rights aims to end racial and social inequalities by challenging discriminatory legislation, advocating for human rights, and by shifting the narrative to give a voice to marginalized communities. The organization defends the rights laid out in the US Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its founding, the Center for Constitutional Rights has continually defended the rights of marginalized people, including those from racial, ethnic, and minority backgrounds. The organization has participated in and won 38 historic litigation cases challenging racial injustices in the US. It has another 40 active cases calling on the rights of minorities to be protected. CCR also provides training and resources to the New York Police Department to prevent racial profiling and stereotyping. 

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to the Center for Constitutional Rights by donating directly through their website. You can also show your support to the organization by attending events, panels, and rallies that fight for racial equality. 

National Urban League: Empowering Marginalized Communities To Reach Their Potential

The National Urban League (NUL) was founded in 1910, in New York City, by two civil rights activists: George Edmund Haynes and Ruth Standish Baldwin. The organization was established amidst the Great Migration, which saw a large number of African Americans moving from southern to northern states. The founders’ objectives were to empower African Americans to move to northern cities through social and economic capacity-building programs.

Their impact and transparency ratings: The National Urban League has a perfect Accountability and Transparency score of 100 out of 100 from Charity Navigator. The organization also holds a Silver Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, showcasing their commitment to racial equality and justice.   

“To enable and empower African-Americans and others in underserved communities to achieve their highest human potential.”

National Urban League

What they do: The National Urban League promotes the equal rights of African Americans across 300 communities and 37 US states through social justice and education initiatives, as well as public advocacy and community programming. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its founding, the National Urban League has fought for racial equality on a national scale, serving over 1.7 million people annually with their programming and advocacy work. For example, in 2019, the organization provided job training opportunities to more than 1,000 unemployed and low-income seniors from minority backgrounds living in urban areas. In the same year, NUL also assisted more than 200 students from minority backgrounds with job readiness and skills development courses. 

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to the National Urban League by donating directly through the charity’s website. 

Black Girls Code: Promoting Racial Equality by Empowering Women of Color

Black Girls Code (BGC) was founded in 2011 by Kimberly Bryant, a mother and engineer, whose passion was to empower young, Black women in STEM-related fields. She was frustrated that the industries’ positions were filled predominantly with white men, and decided to open an organization that could train women of color to reach their potential in tech fields. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: In 2019, Black Girls Code spent approximately 70% of its income on after-school coding programs for young women of color, according to Charity Navigator. The organization also receives funding support from various high-profile donors, including Google and Lyft

“We build pathways for young women of color to embrace the current tech marketplace.”

Black Girls Code

What they do: Black Girls Code promotes racial equality by giving young women of color the skills necessary to succeed in tech industries dominated by white males. The organization offers training courses to build and develop technical skills to compete in the STEM fields. It provides learning opportunities to women of color to achieve racial equality. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its inception, Black Girls Code has garnered more than 4,000 volunteers across the country to promote women of color in technology fields. They have also trained approximately 20,000 young, Black women in its 15 city chapters in the US. 

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to Black Girls Code by donating directly via the organization’s website. You can also get involved by volunteering as a technical assistant, mentor, or instructor. Black Girl Code hosts a range of events that you can attend or volunteer at as well.

The Sentencing Project: Advancing Racial Equality Through Criminal Justice Reforms

The Sentencing Project was founded in 1986 by Malcolm C. Young, a lawyer and civil rights activist. Young created the organization as a means to provide advocacy and legal aid to minorities that were unfairly sentenced to long-term incarceration. He also wanted to defend the rights of vulnerable youth and adults who were victims of the flawed criminal justice. He did this by promoting voting rights and encouraging public policy reforms. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: The Sentencing Project maintains a 4-star ranking and a Financial Transparency score of 91 out of 100 from Charity Navigator. The organization also holds a Silver Star of Transparency from GuideStar. In 2020, approximately 80% of their income was spent on programming and advocacy.

“To promote effective and humane responses to crime that minimize imprisonment and criminalization of youth and adults by promoting racial, ethnic, economic, and gender justice.”

The Sentencing Project

What they do: The Sentencing Project aims to combat practices that unfairly criminalize, stereotype, and marginalize people of color. They achieve this by promoting voting rights to minorities with felony convictions, empowering youth through advocacy, and challenging legislation that hinders people of color from accessing their civil rights. 

What they’ve achieved: Since the organization’s founding, the Sentencing Project has restored voting rights to nearly 4,000 incarcerated individuals, many of whom are predominantly people of color. The charity has also pushed for sentence reviews for more than 500 incarcerated people who have already served at least 15 years in prison and committed their offenses while under the age of 25. The Sentencing Project has played an influential role in criminal legislation reforms in more than 7 US states, including New York and Louisiana. 

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to the Sentencing Project by donating through the organization’s website. You can also get involved by writing to your local representatives to end harmful practices or joining a local movement to show your support.

Anti-Slavery International: Combatting Stereotypes That Lead to Harmful Practices 

Anti-Slavery International was founded in the United Kingdom in 1839 by two abolitionists, Thomas Clarkson and Thomas Fowell Buxton. The organization was formally established to criminalize the transatlantic slave trade, which transported Black slaves from Africa to the Americas, and to put an end to indentured labor systems in the British colonies. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: Anti-Slavery International publishes annual reports detailing their work and financial transparency. For example, in 2019, the organization spent over ÂŁ2 million to eradicate slavery in its target countries. Anti-Slavery International also receives generous funding from high-profile donors, including the European Commission and the UK Home Office. 

“To help end the systemic inequality that hampers efforts to bring freedom and justice for everyone, everywhere, always.”

Anti-Slavery International

What they do: Anti-Slavery International works to eradicate all forms of modern slavery and provide support to victims of slavery. The organization also tackles the primary causes of modern slavery, including racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination, through advocacy and awareness-raising programs. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its founding, Anti-Slavery International has expanded its reach across 10 countries and provided support to 14 anti-slavery partner organizations that work locally to combat racial inequalities, discrimination, and harmful practices that can lead to forms of modern slavery. The organization has reached over 19,000 people annually with its programming and in-country activism. For example, the organization provided assistance to 800 children and 1,317 adults in Niger who were victims of slavery by descent.

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to Anti-Slavery International by donating directly through the organization’s website. You can also join a local campaign and advocate on behalf of the organization. 

Minority Rights Group International: Advocates for Racial and Ethnic Equality

Minority Rights Group International (MRG) was founded in 1969 by David Astor, an editor for the Observer newspaper, based in the United Kingdom. Astor noticed an increase in the number of racial and ethnic persecution stories that were being covered by the newspaper. He decided to take action by publishing details of the gross human rights violations being committed around the world, hoping to bring more attention to the issues and encourage governments to shift their policies. Within a few weeks of forming MRG, the organization received its first external grant, enabling it to grow and expand its reach on minority advocacy.

Their impact and transparency ratings: Minority Rights Group International publishes annual reports that disclose their financial standing and commitment to minority rights. For example, the organization has spent nearly 87% of its annual income on advocacy and programming. Minority Rights Group International also receives funding from a range of high-profile donors, including UNHCR and the European Commission

“To ensure that disadvantaged minorities and indigenous peoples, often the poorest of the poor, can make their voices heard.”

Minority Rights Group International

What they do: Minority Rights Group International promotes the rights of minorities around the world, especially people of color, indigenous groups, and those living in poverty. They achieve this through specialized programs and advocacy work in their target communities. The organization also has more than 150 partners worldwide that help implement local policy changes and empower minority groups.

What they’ve achieved: Since its inception, Minority Rights Group International has expanded across more than 50 countries to advocate for and defend the rights of minority groups. In 2017, the organization also implemented 2 programs in Ukraine and Pakistan to combat racial discrimination and promote racial equality for minority groups. In the same year, Minority Rights Group International supported equality programs in 5 other countries, including Egypt, Morocco, and Jordan.

Ways to contribute: You can contribute to Minority Rights Group International by donating via the organization’s website. 

International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights: Promoting Racial Equality in Latin America

The International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights (IIREHR) was founded by Carlos Quesada, a journalist, attorney, and human rights activist. He founded the organization with the purpose of highlighting human rights violations in Latin America, and primarily those that targeted people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. IIREHR is based in Washington, D.C., and operates with partners across Latin America. 

Their impact and transparency ratings: The International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights maintains a solid Finance and Accountability score of 100 out of 100 from Charity Navigator. For example, in 2019, approximately 96% of the organization’s income was spent on its programming to combat discrimination. 

“Work to promote racial, ethnic and gender equality, and to promote the rights of people who face discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.”

International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights

What they do: The International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights defends the rights of Latin America’s most vulnerable populations and advocates for racial equality of Afro-Latinos and indigenous people. The organization also supports social and policy changes that empower marginalized communities. 

What they’ve achieved: Since its founding, the International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights has expanded across 8 countries in Latin America, including Mexico, Peru, and Cuba. The organization has also launched a number of anti-racism and discrimination campaigns in their target countries, including 2 in Brazil and the Dominican Republic. IIREHR has partnered with more than 25 anti-racism organizations to support their work locally and reinforce racial equality.

Ways to contribute: You can donate to the International Institute on Race, Equality, and Human Rights by donating through the organization’s online portal. 

How Can You Select the Best Charities to Support?

The charities on the list are, we deem, the best charities that fight for racial equality. However, you may have a particular charity you want to support. Let’s look at what you can do to ensure your contribution has the most significant impact.

  • Check out the charity website. Charities that are worthy of your donations are transparent in their mission and their figures. Familiarise yourself with their history, mission, and values. Their website usually is the best place to start.
  • Identify the charity’s mission. Without a goal, the charity is likely to fail. If the charity’s mission isn’t clear, it’s probably worth looking for a charity that does have a clear mission. 
  • Check if the charity has measurable goals. An effective charity has clear goals. You want to know your donation will help the charity reach its goals. But if it doesn’t have targets, it’s likely to fail or squander your gift. The charity should be able to account for its spending and supply evidence of the work they do.
  • Assess the successes or goals the charity has achieved. You wouldn’t invest in a business if it kept missing its targets. In the same way, charities are like this too. If no one is assessing the progress a charity makes in reaching its targets, the chances are not making positive change.
  • Check the charity’s financials and stats. Trustworthy organizations will publish financial statements and reports each year. Some might be exempt from having to do so, but they should be able to provide them to public members who are interested in donating.
  • Locate sources who work with or benefit from the charity. Word of mouth and first-hand experience of a charity’s work lets you know the charity’s quality. If you’re able to do so, check out the charity for yourself or speak to someone familiar with it. This way, your donation will go to the right place. 

How Can You Best Support These Charities?

After you’ve made your decision, it’s time for you to decide on how you’d like to help the charities you’ve chosen. Check how you can help – each charity runs specific programs that have unique aims. Find out what the aim of such programs is and whether they are right for you. 

Here are a few ways you can help your chosen charity:

  • Donate money. You can find donation pages on the website of most charities. Your donation can be a one-time payment, or you can set it to be deducted regularly at different intervals. You can mostly pay via credit card, but some charities also take PayPal or Bitcoin payments.
  • Buy their official merchandise. The charities can also raise money by selling merchandise. So, you can support them by buying the mugs, shirts, caps, pens, pencils, and any other such items they may be selling. Ideally, you should buy as much as you can to share and spread the word about the charity’s activities.
  • Donate a percentage of your online purchases. If you bought anything on sites like Amazon lately, you’d find a prompt asking you to donate to your favorite charities through their Amazon Smile program. You can set this up so that your chosen charities will get a fraction of your online purchases.
  • Engage in volunteer work. As you’ve seen from our descriptions above, some charities engage in a lot of local and grassroots programs. You can help by taking on and organizing the program in your local area.
  • Help their fundraising efforts. You can spread the word about the charity in your workplace, school, church, etc., and hold creative fundraising drives on social media or offline within your small circles.
  • Share their stories. Most charities have compelling stories that you can share with your audience to attract more people to the cause.

Final Thoughts

Now it is just up to you to select the charity that resonates most with you. And whichever charity you end up choosing and contributing to, we are sure that they will immensely appreciate your support. Hopefully, the information within this article has made this selection process a bit easier for you to support charities dedicated to racial equality – based on the causes that matter most to you.

Stay impactful,



PS: Finally, I want to leave you with a thought-provoking TED talk from Dan Pallotta, a leading philanthropic activist and fundraiser, about what is wrong with the way we think about charities – and what we can do about it:

Sources

Did you know that the internet is a huge polluter of the environment? But fortunately not this site. This site is powered by renewable energy and all hosting-related CO2 emissions are offset by three times as many renewable energy certificates. Find out all about it here.

Three Related Posts

One Unrelated Post