Grace Howarth

Grace loves all things sustainability, and is a lifelong climate activist. She has a First Class Bachelor’s degree in Songwriting and is a professional playwright. She has written and composed a children’s musical about protecting the planet, which will be staged at a zero-waste theatre.

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Illustration of cabbage with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Cabbage? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Cabbage was once considered a luxury vegetable. It was served as an Ancient Roman preventative measure for hangovers and as a sailor’s method for fending off scurvy. With over 400 varieties, this brassica is popular in dishes all over the world: from fermented Korean kimchi and stuffed Polish golabki to English bubble and squeak. However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of cabbage. So, we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of cabbage?

Illustration of cauliflower with its carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Cauliflower? A Life-Cycle Analysis

The humble cauliflower has had a boom in popularity over the last few years. Thanks to gluten-free cauliflower pizza bases, and vegan cauliflower steaks, this vegetable is a staple ingredient in many popular recipes. Despite its current trendiness, cauliflower actually has been around for thousands of years, and was even mentioned in a book by Pliny in the 1st Century. However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of cauliflower. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of cauliflower?

Illustration of asparagus with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Asparagus? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Asparagus has been cultivated for 2,500 years, and can be found in the world’s oldest cookery book – Apicius’ 9th Century ‘On the Subject of Cooking.’ In the right conditions, this vegetable can grow 2 inches a day! Filled with antioxidants and vitamins, asparagus is a fiber-rich healthy choice. However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of asparagus. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of asparagus?

Attempted illustration of kale with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Kale? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Kale is the face of healthy-eating, and one of the most nutritionally dense foods around. Prior to the 90’s, kale was largely grown as an ornamental plant, before a meteoric rise in popularity. Whether in green smoothies, kale chips, or salads, you have likely heard of the superfood power of kale. However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of kale. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of kale?

Attempted illustration of onions with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Onions? A Life-Cycle Analysis

As the third largest fresh vegetable industry in the United States, onions are a staple ingredient in many American households. In fact, onion consumption has risen by an enormous 79% over the last thirty years, and 93% of restaurants in America feature this root vegetable on their menus. However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of onions. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of onions?

Attempted illustration of potatoes with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Potatoes? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Roasted, fried, boiled, or mashed, potatoes are one of the more versatile vegetables, which is why they are the second most consumed food in the United States. Americans, on average, eat a potato every day. Potatoes were even the first vegetable to be grown in space! However, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of potatoes. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of potatoes?

Attempted illustration of carrots with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Carrots? A Life-Cycle Analysis

The humble carrot is a staple ingredient in kitchens around the world. So much so, that carrots take the winning role of America’s most trusted vegetable, and the sixth most consumed vegetable. Carrots are full of nutrients, antioxidants, and carotenoids. As an excellent source of Vitamin A, the debate about whether carrots can help you see in the dark is ongoing, but what cannot be disputed is the health benefits. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of carrots. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of carrots?

Attempted illustration of lettuce with its carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Lettuce? A Life-Cycle Analysis

There is a bounty of lettuce varieties to choose from including romaine, iceberg, and little gem. Lettuce is high in nutrition, but low in calories. It is also rich in vitamin A, and folates, making it a very healthy choice. A star of every salad, lettuce is a very popular vegetable, with 10.7 lb of lettuce consumed per capita. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of lettuce. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of lettuce?

Attempted illustration of a salad bowl with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Salad Mix? A Life-Cycle Analysis

There are hundreds of varieties of salad greens; from spinach, arugula, and kale, to lettuce and cress. They are high in nutrition, but low in calories. They are also rich in vitamins A, C, K, B, and potassium, making them a very healthy choice. Over 40% of consumers report having purchased a salad mix over the last twelve months. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of salad mix. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of salad mix?

Attempted illustration of bell peppers with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Bell Peppers? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Bell peppers are the fifth most popular vegetable in the US. Interestingly, the nutritional value of this food depends on the color of the pepper – with mature red peppers being more potassium-rich, but immature green peppers more polyphenol-rich. Whether stuffed, grilled, or eaten raw, bell peppers are a beloved healthy snack. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of bell peppers. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of bell peppers?

Attempted illustration of cucumbers with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Cucumbers? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Cucumbers are the seventh most popular vegetable in the US. This antioxidant-rich plant is 96% water and is packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Found in salads across the world, cucumber is a beloved healthy snack. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of cucumber. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of cucumbers?

Attempted illustration of celery with its carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Celery? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Celery is the tenth most popular vegetable in the US. It contains only six calories per serving and is known for its anti-inflammatory, and heart health benefits. It is also a great source of potassium, calcium, vitamin K, folate, and flavonoids. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of celery. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of celery?

Attempted illustration of tomatoes with their carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Tomatoes? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Tomatoes are the second most consumed vegetable in the US, and the major dietary source of the antioxidant lycopene, which may reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. They also are a great source of vitamin C, potassium, folate, and vitamin K. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of tomatoes. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of tomatoes?

Attempted illustration of broccoli with its carbon footprint

What Is the Carbon Footprint of Broccoli? A Life-Cycle Analysis

Broccoli is one of the most consumed vegetables in the US, and it is considered a superfood that is high in nutrients, vitamin C, vitamin K, and dietary fiber. Yet, much less is shared about the environmental impact, and especially the carbon emissions of broccoli. So we had to ask: What is the carbon footprint of broccoli?