9 Best Charities That Fight Hate Crimes (Complete 2024 List)

9 Best Charities That Fight Hate Crimes (Complete 2024 List)

By
Dennis Kamprad

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Hate crimes are criminal offenses against a person or property, often motivated by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or gender identity. In 2021, 12,411 hate crime offenses were recorded across the US, with race/ethnicity being the most reported bias. Fortunately, there are charities that provide information, education on hate violence, and resources to assist communities in responding to hate-motivated acts. So we had to ask: What are the best charities that fight hate crimes?

The best charities that fight hate crimes are the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the New York City Anti-Violence Project. Charities such as The National Center for Victims of Crime and The Center for Justice and Accountability advocate and fight for victim’s rights.

Whether you want to combat hate crimes in your community, advocate for better laws to support victims, or increase awareness of hate crimes, there is a charity for you. Keep reading to learn more about what the best charities that fight hate crimes are all about, how they work, and what your best option would be to make a contribution.

Here’s What All the Best Charities That Fight Hate Crimes Have in Common

The charities on this list were chosen based on their mission, impact and transparency ratings, and achievements.

They operate all over the world, from North America to Asia. And they all share the same goal of preventing and responding to hate crimes.

They also contribute significantly to tackling hate crimes through monitoring and reporting incidents and providing necessary assistance and counseling to victims of hate crimes.

Yet all these charities raise awareness and campaign against intolerance and prejudice.

These Are the 9 Best Charities That Fight Hate Crimes in 2024

Below are our favorite charities that fight hate crimes (you can click on their link to directly jump to their section in this article):

(At the end of this article we’ll also share our six-step approach on how you can select the best charity to support.)

1

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Leading the Fight for Equity and Justice

Logo for NAACP

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded in 1909 by a passionate group of individuals including W. E. B. Du Bois and Moorfield Storey to achieve equity and social inclusion for black people and all persons of color. Today, the charity campaigns against injustice against the black community, from police brutality to voter oppression.

THRIVE.

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Their transparency & ratings:

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) has a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator.

“To achieve equity, political rights, and social inclusion by advancing policies and practices that expand human and civil rights, eliminate discrimination, and accelerate the well-being, education, and economic security of Black people and all persons of color.”

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

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What they do:

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) focuses on working with young leaders to strengthen their advocacy skills and celebrate talents, all while tackling issues important to them, such as hate crimes. They also focus on turning the black community’s priorities into federal public policy through the legislative process and making sure the fight for equality reaches Hollywood by demanding diversity and inclusion for people of color. For example, they are advocating for the implementation of the Clery Act on College campuses to provide information on hate crimes to students and teachers, and make security reports readily available to new students. 

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What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) has grown to over 2,200 chapters nationwide, including branches in Germany and Japan, and has over 500,000 members. To date, they have mobilized more than 2.2 million advocates for policy change. Furthermore, they have assisted more than 57,000 small businesses through their Black-Owned Business Center, and awarded over $3 million in educational scholarships and community impact grants.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate directly to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People through their website. You can also inspire a young mind by creating a scholarship fund.

2

The New York City Anti-Violence Project: All Places Safe Spaces

Logo for The New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP)
AVP's Queer Sexual Violence Awareness Month w/ LogoTV

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Their transparency & ratings:

The New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP) has a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator. The charity also has a Bronze Seal of Transparency from GuideStar.

“To empower lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and HIV-affected communities and allies to end all forms of violence through organizing and education, and support survivors through counseling and advocacy.”

The New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP)

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What they do:

The New York City Anti-Violence Project provides free financial counseling and job readiness services to LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors of hate crimes. For example, they offer crisis intervention and referrals to vetted resources. They also coordinate the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) to create systemic and social change for LGBTQ people nationally.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, The New York City Anti-Violence Project has provided direct client services to 1333 clients. They have also hosted 3 workshops, recruited 172 volunteers, and personally reached 11,545 individuals affected by hate crimes. In addition, their training and technical assistance reached 2833 participants, and their Trans and Gender Non-conforming Leadership Academy graduated 8 participants.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate to the New York City Anti-Violence Project through their website. You can also join the AVP Leadership Society to support LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors of violence.

3

National Center for Victims of Crime: Dedicated to Supporting Victims of Crime

Logo for The National Center for Victims of Crime
2009 NCVRW PSA

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Their transparency & ratings:

The National Center for Victims of Crime has a 3-Star rating from Charity Navigator. The charity also has a Gold Seal of Transparency from GuideStar.

“To forge a national commitment to help victims of crime rebuild their lives.”

National Center for Victims of Crime

⚒️

What they do:

The National Center for Victims of Crime provides direct services and resources to victims of hate crimes and advocates for laws and policies to protect them. They also provide training and technical assistance to victim service organizations and foster cutting-edge thinking about the impact of crime. For example, through their Center for Research and Innovation, the charity works with like-minded organizations to analyze data and better understand victimization trends and victim’s needs to improve the field of victim services. 

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, the National Center for Victims of Crime has continued to fight for the rights of victims of violence, including hate crimes. For example, they led a successful fight for the passage of the Minnesota Child Victims Act, which opened a 3-year window for survivors of childhood sexual abuse to file civil lawsuits. They also distributed over $105 million to 3,536 survivors of mass violence through their National Compassion Fund.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate to the National Center for Victims of Crime through their website. You can also support their Building the Bridge project to rectify disparities in treatment and services for crime victims. 

4

Anti-Defamation League: Fighting Hate for Good

Logo for Anti-Defamation League
#MyGoodFight

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Their transparency & ratings:

The Anti-Defamation League has a 3-Star rating from Charity Navigator.

“To stop the defamation of the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment to all.”

Anti-Defamation League

⚒️

What they do:

The Anti-Defamation League fights antisemitism by shedding light on it and equipping individuals with the tools they need to confront hate crimes. ADL also protects civil rights and advocates for strong hate laws and online hate laws to support those who are targeted victims and to hold perpetrators responsible.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since its founding, the Anti-Defamation League has remained committed to stopping hate crimes in their tracks and ensuring equality for all. For example, in 2021 they conducted a rally to “#ActAgainstAntisemitism” in partnership with other organizations, attracting 25,000 virtual attendees. Furthermore, in 2020, the charity joined the coalition to launch the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, with the aim of holding social media companies accountable for allowing hate on their platforms.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate directly to the Anti-Defamation League through their website. You can also support the charity by advocating or by bringing ADL education to your local school or community.

5

Southern Poverty Law Centre: Committed to Ensuring Justice and Equality for All

Logo for Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC)
Stormfront: 20 Years of Online Hate

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Their transparency & ratings:

The Southern Poverty Law Center has a 4-Star rating from Charity Navigator. They also earned the Gold Seal of Transparency from GuideStar.

“A catalyst for racial justice in the South and beyond, working in partnership with communities to dismantle white supremacy, strengthen intersectional movements, and advance the human rights of all people.”

Southern Poverty Law Center

⚒️

What they do:

The Southern Poverty Law Center fights hate by monitoring hate groups and other extremists, exposing their activities to the public, the media, and law enforcement. They also seek justice for the most vulnerable people in society by advocating for systematic reforms that benefit and protect victims. Furthermore, through their Learning for Justice program, they advance racial justice by partnering with communities to dismantle white supremacy.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Today, the Southern Poverty Law Center tracks over 1,225 hate and anti-government groups operating across the US. Moreover, their staff of more than 100 advocates and lawyers have protected migrant workers from abuse and other forms of hate crime, as well as broken down barriers for women, children, and the LGBTQ community. For example, in 2022, they virtually trained 7,195 educators on anti-racism and exposed 1,221 hate and extremist groups through their annual ‘The Year in Hate’ publication. 

Ways to contribute:

You can donate directly to the Southern Poverty Law Center through their website. You can also support SPLC by gifting from your IRA, called a Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD).

6

One America: Immigrant Power. Collective Change

Logo for One America 
OneAmerica's Movement Family: Reflecting on Wins of the Last 20 Years

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Their transparency & ratings:

One America has a 3-Star rating from Charity Navigator.

“To advances the fundamental principles of democracy and justice at the local, state, and national levels by building power within immigrant communities in collaboration with key allies”

One America 

⚒️

What they do:

One America organizes and advocates for policies that improve the lives of people in their community, including those affected by hate crimes. For example, they work with families and students to build an equitable education system that offers affordable, culturally relevant childcare and early learning programs. They also work to elect pro-immigrant candidates who will govern with them for a just immigration system, inclusive education for all, and a truly representative democracy.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, One America has remained dedicated to improving the lives of vulnerable individuals, including those affected by hate crimes. For example, in 2021, they provided free citizenship services and information to 60 individuals, out of whom 14 went on to become U.S. citizens. They also delivered free English and digital literacy classes to 128 immigrants and refugees across 23 cities via their English at Home program. In addition, they passed Fairstart for Kids, the largest investment in child care and early learning in Washington State history.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate directly to One America through their website. You can also support OneAmerica by volunteering or by getting involved in one of their campaigns for justice.

7

The Centre for Justice and Accountability: Bringing Human Rights Abusers to Justice

Logo for The Centre for Justice and Accountability PNG logo
Bringing human rights abusers to justice

🔎

Their transparency & ratings:

The Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) has a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator.

“To deter torture, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and other severe human rights abuses around the world through innovative litigation, policy, and transitional justice strategies.”

The Center for Justice and Accountability 

⚒️

What they do:

The Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) prosecutes human rights abusers and seeks justice for victims of torture, crimes against humanity, hate crimes, and other human rights abuses. They also work with policymakers and civil society groups to ensure effective prosecution of atrocity crimes and to protect and rehabilitate victims.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) has won judgments in high-profile cases against perpetrators of human rights abuse in Bosnia, Cambodia, Chile, China, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Peru, Somalia, and Timor-Leste. They advocated for policies to ban torture, developed and expanded key legal doctrines in torture cases, and supported the treatment of torture survivors in the US and abroad. They also developed a legal doctrine that sets standards for international human rights prosecutions.

Ways to contribute:

You can donate to the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) through their website. You can also support the charity by joining their Justice Circle to help achieve justice for victims of hate crime.

8

Victims First: Dedicated to Helping Victims of Mass Casualty Crime

Logo for Victims First
An URGENT Message from Families and Survivors of Mass Shootings

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Their transparency & ratings:

Victims First holds a Platinum Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, their highest rating.

“100% of what is donated to the National Mass Shooting Victims’ Fund goes directly to mass shooting victims/survivors.”

Victims First

⚒️

What they do:

Victims First’s main goals are to educate communities and elected officials on best practices to aid survivors of a mass casualty event, and to raise funds that go directly to survivors. 100% of funds donated to their National Mass Shooting Victims’ Fund go directly to survivors of gun violence, unlike some past community nonprofits that have been formed in the wake of mass casualty events claiming to donate 100% of donations.

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, Victims First successfully established funds that sent 100% of contributions directly to victims of the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012, the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, and the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting in 2016. They also established the National Compassion Fund, which quickly establishes 100% transparent victims’ funds wherever tragedy strikes alongside local fundraising. 

Ways to contribute:

You can donate directly to Victims First via their website. You can also spread the word about their important work on social media using their designated hashtags.

9

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation: Transforming the Lives of the LGBTQ+ Community

Logo for Human Rights Campaign Foundation
The Reality Flag

🔎

Their transparency & ratings:

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation has a 3-star rating from Charity Navigator.

“To create a world where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people, plus community members who use different language to describe identity, are ensured equality and embraced as full members of society.

Human Rights Campaign Foundation

⚒️

What they do:

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation provides educational resources, training, and technical assistance for the child welfare system on LGBTQ+ inclusion, to prevent discrimination and hate crimes. They also advocate for LGBTQ+ workplace equality by providing information and guidance. Moreover, they combat discrimination against transgender people through economic empowerment, capacity-building, community engagement, and public safety education campaigns. 

🚀

What they’ve achieved:

Since their founding, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation has provided $1,000 micro-grants to over 30 organizations and individuals to address the root causes of the physical danger, hatred, and discrimination faced by transgender people in the US. They have now reached 17 million U.S.-based employees and 13 million employees around the globe. Furthermore, they provide professional development to over 5,000 youth-serving professionals annually. 

Ways to contribute:

You can donate to the Human Rights Campaign Foundation through their website. You can also get involved by volunteering to work on the front lines of the fight for LGBTQ+ equality.

How Can You Select the Best Charities to Support?

The charities on the list are, we deem, the best charities that fight hate crimes. However, you may have a particular charity you want to support. Let’s look at what you can do to ensure your contribution has the most significant impact.

  • Check out the charity website. Charities that are worthy of your donations are transparent in their mission and their figures. Familiarize yourself with their history, mission, and values. Their website usually is the best place to start.
  • Identify the charity’s mission. Without a goal, the charity is likely to fail. If the charity’s mission isn’t clear, it’s probably worth looking for a charity that does have a clear mission. 
  • Check if the charity has measurable goals. An effective charity has clear goals. You want to know your donation will help the charity reach its goals. But if it doesn’t have targets, it’s likely to fail or squander your gift. The charity should be able to account for its spending and supply evidence of the work they do.
  • Assess the successes or goals the charity has achieved. You wouldn’t invest in a business if it kept missing its targets. In the same way, charities are like this too. If no one is assessing a charity’s progress in reaching its targets, the chances are they’re not making a substantial positive change.
  • Check the charity’s financials and stats. Trustworthy organizations will publish financial statements and reports each year. Some might be exempt from having to do so, but they should be able to provide them to public members who are interested in donating.
  • Locate sources who work with or benefit from the charity. Word of mouth and first-hand experience of a charity’s work lets you know the charity’s quality. If you’re able to do so, check out the charity for yourself or speak to someone familiar with it. This way, your donation will go to the right place. 

How Can You Best Support These Charities?

After you’ve made your decision, it’s time for you to decide on how you’d like to help the charities you’ve chosen. Check how you can help – each charity runs specific programs that have unique aims. Find out what the aim of such programs is and whether they are right for you. 

Here are a few ways you can help your chosen charity:

  • Donate money. You can find donation pages on the website of most charities. Your donation can be a one-time payment, or you can set it to be deducted regularly at different intervals. You can mostly pay via credit card, but some charities also take PayPal or Bitcoin payments.
  • Buy their official merchandise. The charities can also raise money by selling merchandise. So, you can support them by buying the mugs, shirts, caps, pens, pencils, and any other such items they may be selling. Ideally, you should buy as much as you can to share and spread the word about the charity’s activities.
  • Engage in volunteer work. As you’ve seen from our descriptions above, some charities engage in a lot of local and grassroots programs. You can help by taking on and organizing the program in your local area.
  • Help their fundraising efforts. You can spread the word about the charity in your workplace, school, church, etc., and hold creative fundraising drives on social media or offline within your small circles.
  • Share their stories. Most charities have compelling stories that you can share with your audience to attract more people to the cause.

Final Thoughts

Now it is up to you to select the charity that resonates most with you. And whichever charity you end up choosing and contributing to, we are sure that they will immensely appreciate your support. Hopefully, the information within this article has made this selection process a bit easier for you to support charities dedicated to fighting hate crimes – based on the causes that matter most to you.

Stay impactful,



PS: Finally, I want to leave you with a thought-provoking TED talk from Dan Pallotta, a leading philanthropic activist and fundraiser, about what is wrong with the way we think about charities – and what we can do about it:

The way we think about charity is dead wrong | Dan Pallotta

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