Is Eating Tomatoes Ethical & Sustainable? Here Are the Facts

Is Eating Tomatoes Ethical & Sustainable? Here Are the Facts

By
Grace Howarth

Read Time:26 Minutes

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Tomatoes are the second most consumed vegetable in the US and the major dietary source of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and cancer. They also are a great source of vitamin C, potassium, folate, and vitamin K. Yet, much less is shared about the effect tomatoes have on the planet and communities. So we had to ask: Is eating tomatoes ethical and sustainable?

Eating tomatoes can be unethical due to the modern-day slavery and child labor found within the industry. As well as this, farmers often work in poor conditions for very little pay. It is important to find out where your tomatoes were farmed to ensure they are as ethically produced as possible.

Eating tomatoes is somewhat unsustainable as tomatoes have the second highest carbon footprint when compared to other popular vegetables. As well as this, they have high land and pesticide requirements, which can affect soil health and cause biodiversity loss.

In this article, we will assess both the ethical and sustainability practices of the tomato industry. Through these two lenses, you will be able to gain in-depth knowledge of the overall impacts of the tomatoes that you eat!

Here’s How We Assessed the Ethics & Sustainability of Tomatoes

The Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems (SAFA) is one of the ways we measure the externalities of our actions, like the consumption of tomatoes. It is a holistic assessment based on the potential impact of food and agriculture operations on the environment and people. Those impacts are changes in our environment that can have adverse effects on the air, land, water, fish, and wildlife or the inhabitants of the ecosystem.

Ethical: The discipline concerned with what is morally good and bad and morally right and wrong”

Encyclopedia Britannica

Ethics and sustainability are closely interconnected concepts that share a common objective: the well-being and preservation of our planet, including all its life and future generations.

Sustainable: The ability to be maintained at a certain rate or level | Avoidance of the depletion of natural resources in order to maintain an ecological balance”

Oxford Dictionary

Basically, all goods and services you buy—including tomatoes—leave an impact on people, animals, and our environment. And when it comes to food in general—and tomatoes in specific—the following are key factors for their ethics and sustainability:

To understand the overall environmental impact of tomatoes, we must assess each of their key factors. This Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems (SAFA) is a tool developed for assessing the impact of food and agriculture operations on the environment and people. And this tool helps us to evaluate whether eating tomatoes is ethical & sustainable.

Here’s How Ethical & Sustainable Eating Tomatoes Is

All crops have an impact on the environment, as a great many resources, like land and water, are needed to produce food on a mass scale. As well as this, the global consumption of a crop will lead to ethical and sustainable issues, such as land loss and exploitation of workers across the world.

Overall, tomatoes are one of the least ethical and sustainable choices when it comes to vegetables, due to severe concerns about child labor and modern day slavery in the tomato farming industry. As well as this, they have a high carbon footprint, require a lot of land, and can cause biodiversity loss. However, they do have a relatively small water footprint compared to other salad vegetables.

So, let’s have a look at the ethics & sustainability impact of each key factor of tomatoes!

Key Assessment FactorsEthics & Sustainability
Social and economic conditions of tomatoesUnfortunately, the tomato industry is linked to severely unethical practice. Many farmers live in poverty, work long hours in direct sunlight, and are at risk of serious health issues. Many slave labor and child labor issues have also been uncovered in investigations of tomato farms in China, Mexico, Paraguay, and Italy
Seasonality of tomatoesTomatoes are warm-season crops, which tend to be in-season during the summer months, depending on your location. While warmer states can grow them year-round, summer is the best time to purchase tomatoes to ensure their quality and sustainability.
Land requirements for tomatoesTomatoes require a lot of land to grow, meaning that their environmental impact is quite high. As one of the most land-intensive plant-based foods, often imported from Mexico and Canada, this crop contributes to soil erosion, biodiversity loss, and carbon emissions from transportation. As such, when it comes to land requirements, tomatoes are not the most ethical or sustainable choice.
Water footprint of tomatoesOverall, tomatoes have a relatively small global average water footprint of 180 liters per kilo of produce. They require irrigation, in a lot of cases, which has a negative impact on freshwater and ocean pollution. However, in comparison to other crops, they are not overly water-intensive.
Agrochemical usage for tomatoesTomatoes often require agrochemicals, such as pesticides, as well as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers. This vegetable can be vulnerable to disease and crop failure, so compared to other crops, the agrochemical use can be significant. Thus, this makes tomatoes a relatively unsustainable crop when it comes to agrochemical use.
Carbon footprint of tomatoesTomatoes have a fairly high carbon footprint of 0.82 kg (1.8 lbs) CO2e per pound of produce. The main factor for these emissions is agriculture, which accounts for 94.53% of the overall carbon footprint of tomatoes, because of the large amount of land needed to grow this crop.
Waste generation of tomatoesA massive 31% of fresh tomatoes are wasted annually, which is the equivalent of each person in the country throwing out 21 tomatoes a year. For every pound of food waste, 1.13 kg (2.5 lbs) of CO2e is emitted. More research needs to be undertaken on the overall impact of the End-of-Life stage of tomatoes, but buying loose produce and composting tomato waste are steps that we can take to make tomatoes a more sustainable and ethical choice.

These are the overall summaries, but there is a lot more to the story. In the next few sections, we will dive deeper into each stage to illustrate to you all the important aspects of tomatoes’ ethics & sustainability.

How Ethical & Sustainable Are the Social and Economic Conditions for Tomatoes

Unfortunately, the tomato industry is linked to severely unethical practice. Many farmers live in poverty, work long hours in direct sunlight, and are at risk of serious health issues. Many slave labor and child labor issues have also been uncovered in investigations of tomato farms in China, Mexico, Paraguay, and Italy

Everything we consume was made or harvested by somebody. In past centuries, this was often someone who lived in your community and who you might have even known personally. But through the rise of globalized distribution systems, we have become increasingly alienated from the people who make our food. This leaves a lot of room for exploitation and abuse, both of which are rampant in the food industry. Here, we will look at how the tomato industry fares in relation to these ethical questions.

How ethical & sustainable are the social and economic conditions of growing tomatoes?

In short, the tomato industry is rife with socioeconomic issues and the exploitation of workers. Though much is being done to improve working conditions for US farmers, the global industry has been linked to slave and child labor, making it a deeply unethical crop.

How Ethical & Sustainable Is the Seasonality for Tomatoes

Tomatoes are warm-season crops, which tend to be in-season during the summer months, depending on your location. While warmer states can grow them year-round, summer is the best time to purchase tomatoes to ensure their quality and sustainability.

Every crop has a natural season in which they grow, usually lasting a couple of months.. However, international demand for every kind of crop is year-round. This demand is often met by importing crops from tropical places which can grow year-round, or by growing them in greenhouses. Both of these methods use more resources and are thus less sustainable than conventional farming. Here, we will look at how the tomato industry accommodates year-round demand.

How ethical & sustainable is it to grow tomatoes in-season vs out-of-season?

  • When is the natural season for growing and harvesting tomatoes: In hotter states, like California and Florida, tomatoes can be grown year-round. However, the best season for tomatoes is during the summer months, as they are warm-season plants. Eating seasonally means that there is less of a reliance on imported or greenhouse-grown tomatoes, making them a more sustainable option in the summer.
  • How are tomatoes naturally grown in-season: There are two types of tomatoes; determinate, which grow on bushes, and indeterminate, which grow on vines. In-season tomatoes are often grown in fields rather than greenhouses. Greenhouses are often energy-intensive, making in-season tomatoes more sustainable than out-of-season tomatoes.
  • How are tomatoes grown out-of-season: During the colder months, in cooler states, tomatoes are often grown in greenhouses, which can use a lot of energy. Otherwise, tomatoes will be imported from warmer states or countries, increasing the carbon footprint of transporting this crop. When possible, try to eat seasonally to make your diet as sustainable as you can.

In short, seasonal tomatoes will always be more sustainable than out-of-season tomatoes, as they will be tastier and less likely to rely on greenhouses or importation.

How Ethical & Sustainable Are the Land Requirements for Tomatoes

Tomatoes require a lot of land to grow, meaning that their environmental impact is quite high. As one of the most land-intensive plant-based foods, often imported from Mexico and Canada, this crop contributes to soil erosion, biodiversity loss, and carbon emissions from transportation. As such, when it comes to land requirements, tomatoes are not the most ethical or sustainable choice.

Illustration of global land use for food production
Our World in Data: Global land use for food production

The growth stage has a major impact on the sustainability of crops. The amount of land used, especially in relation to its expansion, the method with which they are grown, and their effect on surrounding land and wildlife are all important factors. In this section, we will look at the ways in which tomatoes’ land usage affects their sustainability.

How ethical & sustainable are the land requirements for growing tomatoes?

In short, compared to other crops, the land requirements of tomatoes negatively affect the overall sustainability and ethical impact of this crop. They require lots of land to grow, which can lead to soil erosion, as well as loss of habitable land and biodiversity.

How Ethical & Sustainable Is the Water Footprint of Tomatoes

Overall, tomatoes have a relatively small global average water footprint of 180 liters per kilo of produce. They require irrigation, in a lot of cases, which has a negative impact on freshwater and ocean pollution. However, in comparison to other crops, they are not overly water-intensive.

Water usage is one of the most important factors in a vegetable’s sustainability. Practices like irrigation use significant resources and can cause pollution, and as such, factors like the amount of water used, where it is sourced, as well as the way they affect surrounding water sources, are all important. Here, we will look at these different angles of tomatoes’ water footprint.

How ethical & sustainable is the water footprint of growing tomatoes?

In short, tomatoes have a relatively small water footprint compared to other crops. However, the intensive farming of any crop will negatively affect the environment.

How Ethical & Sustainable Is the Agrochemical Usage for Tomatoes

Tomatoes often require agrochemicals, such as pesticides, as well as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers. This vegetable can be vulnerable to disease and crop failure, so compared to other crops, the agrochemical use can be significant. Thus, this makes tomatoes a relatively unsustainable crop when it comes to agrochemical use.

Pesticides and fertilizers are agrochemicals that are very unsustainable and damaging to ecosystems. This is because they require resources to create and can easily run off into groundwater and soil systems. Here, we will look at how sustainable tomatoes’ pesticide and fertilizer rates really are.

How ethical & sustainable is the agrochemical usage of growing tomatoes?

In short, tomatoes are a relatively vulnerable crop, meaning that agrochemicals are often used, which have a negative impact on the environment. When it comes to vegetables, choosing organic produce or crops featured in the Environmental Working Group’s ‘Clean Fifteen’ can be a more ethical and sustainable option.

How Ethical & Sustainable Is the Carbon Footprint of Tomatoes

Tomatoes have a fairly high carbon footprint of 0.82 kg (1.8 lbs) CO2e per pound of produce. The main factor for these emissions is agriculture, which accounts for 94.53% of the overall carbon footprint of tomatoes, because of the large amount of land needed to grow this crop.

Illustration of global greenhouse gas emissions from food production
Our World in Data: Global greenhouse gas emissions from food production

Carbon footprint is one aspect of the overall sustainability of a crop. It essentially measures how much carbon or other greenhouse gasses the production of crops emits into the atmosphere. Emissions from product manufacturing, irrigation, transportation fuel, and landfills all add up to create the overall carbon footprint of a crop. Let’s see how the carbon footprint of tomatoes contributes to their overall sustainability.

How ethical & sustainable is the carbon footprint of tomatoes?

  • What is the overall carbon footprint of tomatoes: The overall carbon footprint of tomatoes is 0.82 kg (1.8 lbs) CO2e per pound of produce, which is relatively high for vegetables. Out of the ten most popular vegetables, tomatoes have the second highest carbon footprint.
  • What are the main contributors to the carbon footprint of tomatoes: The main factors that contribute to the carbon emissions of tomatoes are the amount of land needed to grow this vegetable, as well as high pesticide requirements.
  • Which life-cycle stage of tomatoes has the highest carbon footprint: The growing stage of tomatoes is 0.77 kg (1.7lb) CO2e per pound of produce. This makes up an enormous 94.53% of the overall carbon footprint of tomatoes. They require a lot of land, which means that they are not the most sustainable crop to grow.

In short, compared to other vegetables, tomatoes have a very high carbon footprint. This means that they are not the most ethical or sustainable choice. Because tomatoes are the most consumed vegetable, the scale of tomato consumption is high, and thus, the carbon emissions released when growing tomatoes are even higher.

Related: Check out our full article on “What Is the Carbon Footprint of Tomatoes? A Life-Cycle Analysis” to find out all about the carbon footprint of tomatoes and how each stage of their life-cycle contributes to it (plus, what you can do to reduce your carbon footprint when shopping for tomatoes).

How Ethical & Sustainable Is the Waste Generation of Tomatoes

A massive 31% of fresh tomatoes are wasted annually, which is the equivalent of each person in the country throwing out 21 tomatoes a year. For every pound of food waste, 1.13 kg (2.5 lbs) of CO2e is emitted. More research needs to be undertaken on the overall impact of the End-of-Life stage of tomatoes, but buying loose produce and composting tomato waste are steps that we can take to make tomatoes a more sustainable and ethical choice.

When crop waste, either in the form of packaging or organic materials, is disposed of, it can cause a lot of problems. Whether it’s damaging wildlife, getting into oceans, emitting methane, or dissolving into microplastics that contaminate groundwater, all these materials have their part to play. The sheer amount of waste we produce is reaching a crisis point and won’t be able to continue much longer. In this section, we look at how sustainable tomatoes’ waste generation is.

How ethical & sustainable is the waste generation of tomatoes?

  • What is the packaging of tomatoes: There are many methods of packaging tomatoes, including cardboard cartons, plastic boxes, plastic wrap, wooden crates, or cardboard boxes. Processed tomatoes are also packaged in a variety of ways, from aluminum cans to plastic bottles and glass jars. The most eco-friendly choice is to buy loose tomatoes, which have been packed in biodegradable boxes.
  • How is the packaging of tomatoes disposed of: Some retailers, such as British-based Marks and Spencer, are moving closer towards fully recyclable cardboard cartons for tomatoes. Most plastic film, or plastic cartons are difficult, if not impossible, to recycle. Choosing loose produce will reduce the harm of plastic waste and the need for recycling resources. Interestingly, studies are being made into using tomato waste as bio-lacquers for food packaging, which aims to reduce the packaging waste of other products. 
  • How are tomatoes disposed of: Unfortunately up to 86.7% of tomatoes are thrown away due to appearance, before even reaching stores. The resources used to grow these crops just to discard them are enormous, and negatively impact the carbon footprint of tomatoes. To reduce this waste, the demand for ‘wonky fruit and veg’ has been rising. Buying imperfect produce will lead to farmers throwing away fewer crops. Tomatoes are completely compostable, though food waste in landfill is a big problem for the environment.

In short, food and plastic waste contribute to our planet’s carbon footprint. Steps can be taken to reduce your individual waste, through buying loose produce and not over-consuming or throwing out tomatoes.

What Have Been Historical Ethics & Sustainability Issues Connected to the Tomato Industry

Historically, the tomato crop has been linked to colonization, with tomatoes being brought to Europe from the Americas by the Spanish Empire. Today, the tomato industry makes up 15% of all vegetable production worldwide. Unfortunately, as well as the negative impacts that tomato farming has on the environment, there are many forced labor and human trafficking concerns linked to the tomato industry.

All crops have had a complex road toward global distribution. They originate in one part of the world and often travel far to end up in your local supermarket. From farm to table, some of our favorite fruits and vegetables have racked up some serious damage along the way. Whether it’s exploiting labor, deforestation to meet demand, water pollution, or disruption of wildlife, most crops have left a path of destruction. Let’s see how tomatoes have fared throughout history.

What have been the key ethical & sustainable issues of the tomato industry?

  • Has labor been exploited because of tomato production: The tomato industry has been known to be rife with humanitarian issues, such as slave labor used on tomato farms in Italy and Mexico. According to an investigation by Medium, laborers work up to “14 hours a day for meager pay, under the eye of a network of gangmasters who make excessive deductions or charge inflated rates for transport, accommodation, food and other ‘services’. Those complaining can face violence and intimidation.” However, thanks to campaigning from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, every fast-food corporation in the US, besides Wendy’s, has signed the Fair Food agreement. This agreement has been implemented on 90% of Florida’s tomato fields, leading to the eradication of slavery for tens of thousands of workers.
  • How much land has been lost because of tomato production: Tomatoes were first cultivated in the South American Andes in 500 BC, before spreading across Europe in the 16th century. The industry is now the world’s twelfth most profitable crop or livestock product, worth $87.9 billion annually. In the industrialization of tomatoes, over 5 million hectares of land are used to grow this crop around the world.
  • Which wildlife species have been negatively impacted or displaced because of tomato production: In the cultivation and harvest of any crop, many small animals like mice, rabbits, and insects will be displaced or killed by the harvesting equipment. Tomato plants are not known to have a negative impact on wildlife but the pesticides used on them can affect surrounding ecosystems. 
  • Have water sources and soil been contaminated because of tomato production: Many studies have been done into the impact of irrigating tomato plants with wastewater, the general consensus being that there is no impact on the vegetable. However, this can cause a buildup of toxic heavy metals in the soil, which has a negative impact on the environment.

In short, the global consumption of tomatoes is linked to many ethical and sustainability concerns. Throughout the history of tomato agriculture, many farmers have been exploited and mistreated. Thankfully, in recent years, there has been campaigning against the modern slavery that blights the industry.

How Can You Reduce Your Environmental Impact and Offset Your Personal Carbon Footprint

There are a few things you can do to ensure the tomatoes you purchase are as ethical and sustainable as possible. You can also consider offsetting your personal and tomato-related carbon emissions, which work to remove carbon emissions elsewhere that are then attributed to you. Here, we will walk you through how to accomplish both of these things.

How Can You Shop for Tomatoes More Ethically & Sustainably

In this section, we give you a short list of ways you can consume tomatoes in the most ethical and sustainable ways possible:

  1. Opt for packaging free produce: If you are unable to find loose tomatoes, choose cardboard-based packaging as opposed to plastic. Plastic waste is hard to recycle and creates an abundance of issues for the environment.
  2. Buy locally: Driving up demand for local produce reduces food miles and lessens greenhouse gas emissions. As well as this, it is more likely that local farmers will be working under more ethical conditions. Making sure to buy tomatoes grown in the US, instead of imported from other countries, will have a positive impact.
  3. Purchase organic: Organic tomatoes produce a much lower carbon footprint than non-organic vegetables, due to the lack of pesticide production, distribution, and the overall higher health of soil for crops, insects, and animals.
  4. Get creative with leftovers: Try not to over-consume in the first place, but if you find yourself with extra tomatoes, make sauces, salsas, purees, pickles, or other recipes that preserve them. This will help reduce your carbon footprint in terms of food waste. If you are stuck for ideas, here are some recipes that might inspire you.

Following some of these methods can really help you to cut down on your environmental impact of eating tomatoes, making them a more sustainable and ethical choice. None of these will completely eradicate these negative impacts, since there are always effects that may be outside of your control. But some reduction is always better than nothing!

Which Organizations Can You Support to Help Promote Ethics & Sustainability

While tomatoes can be the cause of a wide range of environmental damage and ethical issues, there are also some organizations that help you reduce parts of your impact that would otherwise be outside of your control. These organizations are working hard to prevent and reverse ethical and sustainable problems caused by industries like agriculture.

In the table below are some of the best charities that work in the areas where tomatoes production has affected the environment—and beyond:

Overall ethics & sustainabilityBest charities that advance ethics worldwide
Best charities that promote sustainability
Social and economic impactBest charities that help farmers
SeasonalityBest charities that fight to protect our environment
Land requirementsBest charities for reforestation
Best wildlife conservation charities
Best charities for protecting the Amazon rainforest
Water footprintBest charities that fight for clean water
Best charities that help conserve our rivers
Best charities to save our oceans
Agrochemical usageBest charities for helping farm animals
Carbon footprintBest charities for climate change
Best carbon offsets for individuals
Waste generationBest charities that fight to reduce food waste
Best charities that fight to end plastic pollution
Best charities that promote recycling

Though it is helpful to reduce the environmental impact of your personal tomato consumption, supporting these organizations takes your positive impact a step further. You will be reaching far beyond your own consumption impacts and helping to build a better world for everyone!

How Can You Offset Your Personal Carbon Footprint

The carbon footprint is a key part of how sustainable we live. And it is one of the ways we measure the effects of our human-induced global climate change. Yes, even from eating tomatoes!

Carbon footprint: the amount of greenhouse gasses and specifically carbon dioxide emitted by something (such as a person’s activities or a product’s manufacture and transport) during a given period”

Merriam Webster

Basically, it is the amount of carbon emitted by you as an individual or an organization providing you with goods and services – including tomatoes:

Illustration of carbon emissions from food
Our World in Data: Emissions from food alone would take us past 1.5°C or 2°C this century

Carbon Offset: a way for a company or person to reduce the level of carbon dioxide for which they are responsible by paying money to a company that works to reduce the total amount produced in the world, for example by planting trees

Oxford Dictionary

In terms of tomatoes – and indeed all food types – there will always be a carbon footprint, because of the resources it takes to get your food from farms to the place where you’ll eventually eat them. And while there are ways to reduce your carbon footprint when shopping for tomatoes, carbon offsets would be a way to reduce your CO2e emissions all the way down to net zero (or even to become climate positive).

However, when you purchase carbon offsets, it’s important that they actually make a difference in offsetting (aka reducing) total carbon emissions. To achieve that, the following are key criteria:

  • Carbon offset projects have to be effective (different projects have different effectiveness rates)
  • Carbon offset projects have to be additional
  • Carbon offset projects have to be permanent
  • The claims from carbon offset projects have to be verifiable

To find the best carbon offsets for you personally, check out our full guide on the best carbon offsets for individuals, where you’ll also learn more about how these carbon offset projects work, what their respective offsetting costs are, and what your best way would be to offset your own carbon emissions.

Related: Check out our full guide on “What Are the Best Carbon Offsets for Individuals: Complete 2024 List” to find the best carbon offset providers for your personal carbon emissions and those associated to, e.g., eating tomatoes.

Final Thoughts

Overall, tomatoes are one of the least ethical and sustainable crops. The issues surrounding modern day slavery and child labor are grave and widespread. Human rights programs like the Fair Food Program are tirelessly fighting for a fairer tomato industry. Through spreading awareness to these issues, and eating ethically and sustainably purchased tomatoes, you too can help to make the world a better place!

Stay impactful,

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